Connect with us

Health/medicine

Beware of endometriosis, a silent killer of ovaries: Experts warn women

Published

on

Bengaluru, March 8 (IANS) Women should be aware of the rare disease endometriosis, regarded as a silent killer of ovaries and a slow killer of fertility, experts warned on International Women’s Day, as March is also considered the Endometriosis Awareness Month.

Once a rare disease, it is commonly diagnosed these days and the prevalence of endometriosis is on the rise in Karnataka, experts pointed out.

Endometriosis is an inflammatory condition where endometrial tissue (tissue similar to the lining of the uterus) grows outside the uterus.

Endometriosis can make organs like the uterus, bladder, or the bowels stick together at certain points, and this condition is called ‘adhesions’.

Dr Usha BR, Consultant, Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Fertility and Laparoscopic Surgeon, Fortis Hospital, Bannerghatta Road, Bengaluru, explained that approximately 70 per cent of women visiting the outpatient department with complaints of painful menstrual periods and dyspareunia are diagnosed with endometriosis, with some cases being asymptomatic.

“I see a minimum of 25 cases per month. It also causes painful intercourse leading to sexual dysfunction, interpersonal conflicts and later on infertility. Endometriosis is a silent killer of ovaries and slow killer of fertility,” Dr. Usha explained.

ALSO READ:  Are animals passing deadly bacteria to humans?

“Endometriosis that afflicts 10 to 15 per cent of women in their reproductive years and 70 per cent of those with chronic pelvic pain, often remains veiled by misdiagnosis, prolonging needless suffering,” said Dr Ramesh B, Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Chief laparoscopic surgeon, Endometriosis Specialist, Altius Hospital, Bengaluru.

“It usually presents as severe dysmenorrhea, manifested as intense pain during periods, which is frequently dismissed as normal. These women endure not only physical agony but also mental anguish, as their severe pain is often attributed to a presumed lower pain tolerance by their peers,” Dr. Ramesh stated.

With an average diagnostic delay of 6.7 years, the journey is marred by persistent pain and compromised well-being.

Early detection, particularly in adolescence, offers a glimmer of hope, potentially mitigating anguish and preserving fertility, he explained.

In Bengaluru, Karnataka, akin to many regions, the hurdles in diagnosing and managing endometriosis endure, compounded by obstacles like cost and symptom complexity.

ALSO READ:  Why more Indians are getting head and neck cancers

Yet, the prospect of early intervention remains a beacon of hope, promising relief from pain, halting disease progression, and safeguarding the fertility of women throughout the region, Dr. Ramesh stated.

Dr. Sharvari Mundhe, Consultant, Gynaecologist and Fertility Specialist, Motherhood Hospital, Sarjapur, Bengaluru, explained, “Endometriosis poses a significant health challenge for women worldwide, significantly impacting their daily lives and reproductive health. With approximately one in ten women globally affected by this condition, its prevalence is substantial. In India alone, it is estimated that 25 million women are grappling with endometriosis.”

Despite its widespread occurrence, endometriosis remains a perplexing puzzle in the medical domain, often evading detection during diagnosis and leaving women to endure its burdensome effects in silence, she said.

“Urgent attention is needed to develop effective treatment options, given the profound toll it takes on physical, emotional, and reproductive well-being. Empowering women to better manage symptoms and safeguard their reproductive health requires increased investment in research, education, and access to specialised treatment options,” she added.

ALSO READ:  18 per cent of teens drink caffeine to stay awake: Study

Dr. Usha said that endometriosis, affecting 1 in 7 women, often manifests with pelvic pain, heavy periods, and infertility. “Yet, many sufferers may be asymptomatic, unaware of the condition’s presence. Diagnosing endometriosis involves reviewing medical history, conducting pelvic exams, and often requires laparoscopic surgery for definitive confirmation and to remove endometrial tissue outside the uterus,” she said.

Lifestyle changes, such as diet modifications and stress reduction, may complement medical treatments. Early detection and comprehensive management improve outcomes, offering relief and enhancing the quality of life for those affected, concurred the experts.

–IANS

mka/rad

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Health/medicine

Indian-American scientist discovers new biomarker for obsessive compulsive disorder

Published

on

By

New Delhi, July 13 (IANS) A team of researchers led by an Indian-American scientist Dr Sameer Sheth has identified a specific neural activity pattern for patients who suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and have undergone deep brain stimulation (DBS) for its treatment.

The team’s goal was to determine how low-frequency brain oscillations in the theta (4-8 Hertz) to alpha (8-12 Hertz) range, which have been shown in a substantial body of scientific literature to play an important role in cognitive processes, were altered in people with severe, treatment-resistant OCD.

To accomplish this, the team from Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital in the US used a novel feature of contemporary DBS devices: the ability to record brain activity in addition to providing stimulation.

Unlike most studies, which are done in lab conditions, this one was done in real-life situations.

Before DBS, predictable and periodic neural activity was seen and after its activation, symptomatic reactions were seen, because DBS helps the patients let go of their phobias and embedded responses, allowing them to behave more normally, the researchers noted in the study published in the journal Nature Medicine.

ALSO READ:  18 per cent of teens drink caffeine to stay awake: Study

“This neuro-psychological biomarker can serve as a better litmus test to check on the improvements in the lives of people having OCD and could be used for other debilitating conditions as well for they stem from similar neural patterns,” said Dr Sheth at Baylor College of Medicine.

OCD is a prevalent and debilitating mental health illness that affects approximately 2-3 per cent of the global population. In severe circumstances, patients spend a significant amount of time engaging in repetitive compulsions and dwell on intrusive ideas.

OCD has a significant impact on the health and quality of life of patients and careers. Approximately 20-40 per cent of people with severe OCD are resistant to traditional therapies.

Since the early 2000s, DBS therapy has been utilised to control neural activity in specific areas of the brain associated with OCD symptoms.

–IANS

tejaswi/na/uk

Continue Reading

Health/medicine

New biomarkers reveal if glaucoma patients are at high risk of losing eyesight

Published

on

By

New Delhi, July 13 (IANS) A team of researchers has discovered blood markers that may predict whether glaucoma patients are at a higher risk of continuing to lose eyesight after normal therapy.

Glaucoma (known as kala motia in India), affects nearly 11.2 million people aged 40 and above in India. It’s the third common cause of blindness in our country, according to experts.

The main factors for glaucoma are old age and high blood pressure. Treatments to lower the intraocular pressure in the eye are available but they are not foolproof.

Researchers from University College London (UCL) and Moorfields Eye Hospital in the UK investigated whether mitochondrial function, as evaluated in white blood cells, is lower in people with glaucoma and if there is any connection at all.

The subjects were studied on the efficiency of their blood cells using oxygen, the amount of eyesight lost over time, and the levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD).

ALSO READ:  Are animals passing deadly bacteria to humans?

NAD is a chemical in the body that helps cells produce energy and is derived from vitamin B3 in the food.

Firstly, the researchers observed that particular cells in the blood, known as peripheral blood mononuclear cells, use oxygen differently in persons with glaucoma.

Secondly, people with glaucoma have lower amounts of NAD in their blood cells, which means lower oxygen consumption in their body cells, according to the study published in the journal Nature Medicine.

“White blood cell mitochondrial function and NAD levels, if introduced as a clinical test, would enable clinicians to predict which patients are at higher risk of continued vision loss, allowing them to be prioritised for more intensive monitoring and treatment,” said Senior author Professor David (Ted) Garway-Heath from UCL’s Institute of Ophthalmology and Moorfields Eye Hospital.

If research proves that low mitochondrial function or NAD is a factor, then new treatments can be introduced, said authors.

The researchers are now running a major clinical research to see if high-dose vitamin B3 can improve mitochondrial function and minimize vision loss, opening up new avenues.

ALSO READ:  Study finds skin condition behind liver damage in diabetics in India

–IANS

tejaswi/na/svn

Continue Reading

Health/medicine

WHO donates medical supplies worth $9 million to Malawi

Published

on

By

Lilongwe, July 13 (IANS) The World Health Organisation (WHO) has donated assorted medical supplies, including drugs worth $9 million , to the government of Malawi to support the country’s public hospitals.

When presenting the donation on Friday in Lilongwe, Neema Kimambo, the WHO country representative, expressed her organisation’s desire to see public hospitals in Malawi well-stocked and people have better access to healthcare services, reported Xinhua news agency.

Kimambo added that the WHO will continue to support the Malawian government by providing various resources to meet the needs of Malawi’s health system.

Malawian Minister of Health Khumbize Kandodo Chiponda hailed the donation, saying that the supplies will help address the shortage of medical supplies in the country’s public hospitals.

The WHO has been providing vital medicine and medical supplies to the Malawian government since 2022 through the country’s COVID-19 Emergency Response and Health Systems Preparedness Project.

–IANS

int/rs/svn

ALSO READ:  ChatGPT not reliable tool to gauge development delays in children, finds research
Continue Reading

Health/medicine

Deaths from West Nile fever in Israel surge to 31

Published

on

By

Jerusalem, July 13 (IANS) With 12 new fatalities confirmed, Israel has recorded 31 deaths from West Nile fever since an outbreak in the country in early May, health authorities said.

The Health Ministry on Friday, in a statement, reported 49 new infection cases, bringing the country’s total to 405, close to the annual record high of 425 cases in the year 2000, Xinhua news agency reported.

The Ministry attributed the high morbidity to warmer and more humid weather in the region, which is favourable to mosquitoes, a host that transmits the virus from birds through bites to humans.

The Israeli news website Ynet reported that most of the infected are elderly, aged 70 years and above, while children were also diagnosed with the virus.

Most human infections show no to mild cold symptoms, but occasionally, some people develop severe illnesses affecting the central nervous system.

Earlier this week, Israel’s chief veterinary officer, Tamir Goshen, told the news website that 159 birds were found infected with the virus in the last two months, compared to only three infections among birds in 2023.

ALSO READ:  Health insurer Niva Bupa files draft papers for Rs 3,000 crore IPO

–IANS

int/khz

Continue Reading

Health/medicine

Eating beans, peas, lentils, chickpeas may help you manage diabetes better

Published

on

By

New Delhi, July 12 (IANS) Finding it hard to manage your blood sugar levels? Pulses like beans, peas, lentils, and chickpeas can help manage your diabetes, according to a new review of studies on Friday.

Pulses also have positive effects on important cardiovascular biomarkers, like low-density lipoprotein (LDL), also known as bad cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), also known as good cholesterol, revealed the study.

The review, based on 30 articles, contributes to the body of evidence supporting the need for future dietary guidelines and additional research on increasing pulse consumption within optimal dietary patterns.

The most frequently assessed study outcomes included changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, haemoglobin A1c, waist circumference, and C-reactive protein or high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

The review, published in the journal Nutrients, points out the “potential role of pulses in maintaining health and preventing chronic disease”, said Taylor C. Wallace, Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Medicine at George Washington University, US.

ALSO READ:  Why women should prioritise regular thyroid checkups

It also plays a crucial role in “enhancing long-term health, particularly among individuals with chronic conditions like Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease”, Taylor added.

Further, the low-fat content and healthy mono- and polyunsaturated fats, along with essential micronutrients and bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties, further establish pulses as a nutritional powerhouse.

Pulses are also an excellent source of plant protein, rich in fibre, folate, and potassium. They also serve as a rich source of minerals like zinc, iron, calcium, and magnesium, and are therefore vital in diets that prioritise plant-based sources of nutrients.

–IANS

tejaswi/rvt/vd

Continue Reading

Trending