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COPD, asthma to drive India’s critical care ventilator market: Report

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COPD, asthma to drive India’s critical care ventilator market: Report

New Delhi, March 18 (IANS) Increasing cases of chronic respiratory diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and asthma in India are expected to push the growth of critical care ventilator services market in the country at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4 per cent by 2033, according to a report on Monday.

The report by GlobalData, a data and analytics company reveals that India accounted for about 21 per cent of Asia-Pacific’s critical care ventilator market in 2023.

“Urbanisation and industrial expansion have worsened air pollution in India, leading to more respiratory diseases like COPD,” said Kanchan Chauhan, Medical Devices Analyst at GlobalData.

She noted that the advent of the Covid-19 pandemic stressed the critical need for ventilators in treating patients with severe respiratory issues.

Additionally, India is seeing an increase in critical care admissions with the rise in ageing population and evolving disease trends.

“Patients with severe respiratory illnesses often require intensive care and mechanical ventilation. This surge in demand has driven up the need for critical care services and equipment, including ventilators, in hospitals across the country,” Chauhan said.

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“In conclusion, India’s healthcare sector is undergoing a remarkable evolution driven by technological progress, particularly evident in critical care ventilators. The nation’s proactive response to the rising prevalence of respiratory diseases and an ageing population underscores its commitment to innovation, safety, and improving public health outcomes,” Chauhan added.

–IANS

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Union Budget: Health experts hail Centre's move to exempt customs duty on cancer drugs

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Union Budget: Health experts hail Centre's move to exempt customs duty on cancer drugs

Union Budget: Health experts hail Centre's move to exempt customs duty on cancer drugs

New Delhi, July 23 (IANS) Calling it a welcome step, oncologists on Tuesday hailed the Central government’s move to exempt customs duty on three more cancer drugs.

The three drugs are Trastuzumab deruxtecan (for breast cancer), Osimertinib (lung cancer drug for EGFR mutation), and Durvalumab (for lung and biliary tract cancers). Deruxtecan drug can be used in all cancers with Her2 positive gene

Speaking to IANS, Jyotsna Govil, Chairperson of the Indian Cancer Society said that the exemption has “given a relief to the countless cancer patients” in the country.

“The exemption of customs duty on three cancer medicines is a significant step forward. Also, the initiative and public investment in digital infrastructure and innovations will vastly improve access to essential health services for people in Tier II and III and rural areas,” Govil said.

According to Dr Shyam Aggarwal, Chairman, Department of Medical Oncology, at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital: “All imported life-saving drugs are costly and customs duty exemption is a welcome step”.

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“Cancer drugs are very expensive and life-saving. Patients require long-term treatment. All steps to bring the cost down are more than welcome,” he added.

In her seventh budget speech, Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Tuesday also called for exemptions in custom duties on X-ray tubes and flat panel detectors.

“I also propose changes in the BCD (Basic Customs Duty), X-ray tubes, and flat panel detectors for use in medical X-ray machines under the phased manufacturing programme to synchronise them with domestic capacity addition,” said FM Sitharaman.

“Exemption of three life-saving medicines for cancer treatment is a welcome step. Exemption of customs duty on components of X-ray tubes and digital detectors will lead to spurring of indigenous manufacturing of digital X-ray machines in India,” Dr Harsh Mahajan, Founder & Chairman, Chairman FICCI Health Services and Mahajan Imaging & Labs.

“Allocation of funds for innovation and skilling will also help those who are working in the healthcare sector,” he added.

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–IANS

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Here’s how sleep is linked with risk of Type 2 diabetes

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Here’s how sleep is linked with risk of Type 2 diabetes

Here’s how sleep is linked with risk of Type 2 diabetes

New Delhi, July 23 (IANS) Ensuring optimal sleep duration and a consistent sleep schedule may significantly lower the risk of insulin resistance, prediabetes, and Type 2 diabetes, said an expert.

Taking to the social media platform X, Dr. Sudhir Kumar, from Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Hyderabad, highlighted the various sleep-related factors that can influence the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

“Type 2 diabetes risk increases with sleep deprivation, oversleeping, obstructive sleep apnea, and varying sleep duration by more than 30 minutes on different nights,” he said.

He also mentioned that having an evening chronotype, characterised by sleeping late and waking up late, can elevate the risk.

“Shift work, which often leads to poorer sleep, is another factor that increases Type 2 diabetes risk,” the top neurologist said.

He further emphasised that the lowest risk of Type 2 diabetes, in terms of sleep duration and pattern, is observed with a sleep duration of 7-8 hours, minimal variation in sleep duration by less than 30 minutes on different nights, and a morning chronotype — going to bed early and waking up early.

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“Ensuring optimum sleep duration, a consistent sleep schedule, and going to bed early while waking up early could lower the risk of insulin resistance, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes,” said the doctor.

–IANS

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Girls more affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis than boys: Experts

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Girls more affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis than boys: Experts

Girls more affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis than boys: Experts

New Delhi, July 23 (IANS) Girls are more affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis than boys, said experts on Monday highlighting the need for recognising the symptoms early.

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a chronic condition affecting children under 16, characterised by persistent joint inflammation, pain, swelling, and stiffness. The exact causes of JIA are unknown, but it is believed to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Dr Debashish Chanda – Orthopaedics & Joint Replacement Specialist, CK Birla Hospital, Gurugram, said that there was no fixed cause on what triggers JIA, but it would not be completely irresponsible to rule out genetic and environmental causes, but it is a disease that occurs more in girls as compared to boys.

“Children with a family history of arthritis or autoimmune diseases are at higher risk, with girls being more frequently affected than boys. Certain bacterial or viral infections might also trigger JIA in genetically predisposed children,” he told IANS.

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While symptoms of JIA vary, it includes joint discomfort or swelling, persistent pain, fever, rash, fatigue, loss of appetite, and morning stiffness.

Unlike adult arthritis, which is often due to joint cartilage degeneration, JIA is primarily an autoimmune condition with systemic symptoms like fever and rash.

Dr Sanjeev Kapoor, Sr. Consultant Rheumatology at the Indian Spinal Injuries Centre, said, “JIA is the most common paediatric rheumatological disorder, affecting an estimated 350,000 to 1.3 million children in India. There are five types of JIA: systemic arthritis, which affects boys and girls equally; oligoarthritis and polyarthritis, more common in girls; enthesitis-related arthritis, mainly in boys older than 8 years and psoriatic arthritis,” he told IANS.

JIA can also impact a child’s growth and development if not properly managed.

“Recognising these symptoms early is crucial,” Dr Kapoor noted. “Treatment aims to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve the quality of life. Medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and biological agents are commonly prescribed to manage symptoms and prevent joint damage.

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The expert also stressed physical therapy and regular exercise to maintain joint function and muscle strength. In severe cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to correct joint deformities or replace damaged joints.

–IANS

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Boys are at greater risk of developing Type 1 diabetes than girls: Study

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Boys are at greater risk of developing Type 1 diabetes than girls: Study

Boys are at greater risk of developing Type 1 diabetes than girls: Study

New Delhi, July 23 (IANS) Young boys are more at risk of developing Type 1 diabetes (T1D) than girls, finds a study.

It showed that the risk decreases markedly in girls after age 10 years, while the risk in boys stays the same.

Furthermore, the risk of T1D is significantly higher for boys with a single autoantibody — proteins produced by the body’s immune system that attack other proteins.

This suggests that the male gender could be linked with autoantibody development, indicating the importance of incorporating sex in the assessment of risk, said the team from the University of Exeter in the UK.

Importantly, the study showed that, unlike most autoimmune diseases, male sex is a risk factor for type 1 diabetes (T1D).

This raises the hypothesis that either immune, metabolic, or other differences between sexes may impact risk or progression through stages of T1D.

In this study, the team studied 235,765 relatives of people with T1D. They used computer and statistical modelling to calculate the risk of T1D, stated as an estimated five-year risk for females and males respectively, after adjusting for confounders.

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Males were found to have higher autoantibodies (females: 5.0 per cent males: 5.4 per cent).

Males were also more likely to be screened positive for multiple autoantibodies and their chances were also higher in absolute five-year risk of progression to T1D.

“The change in risk at around the age of 10 raises the hypothesis that puberty-related hormones may play a role,” said the team calling for more research.

The findings will be presented at this year’s Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes from September 9-13 in Madrid, Spain.

–IANS

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Economic Survey links mental health disorders with 'significant productivity losses'

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Economic Survey links mental health disorders with 'significant productivity losses'

Economic Survey links mental health disorders with 'significant productivity losses'

New Delhi, July 22 (IANS) In a first, the economic impact of mental health was discussed in the Economic Survey 2023-24 tabled by the Union Finance and Corporate Affairs Minister Nirmala Sitharaman in Parliament on Monday.

The Survey talks extensively about mental health, its significance, and implications on policy recommendations. It also associated mental health disorders with “significant productivity losses”.

It is because the condition leads to “absenteeism, decreased productivity, disability, increased healthcare costs, among others”.

Citing the National Mental Health Survey (NMHS) 2015-16, the Survey noted that 10.6 per cent of adults in the country suffered from mental disorders. However, the treatment gap for mental disorders ranged between 70 per cent and 92 per cent for different disorders. It also showed a higher prevalence of mental morbidity in urban metro regions (13.5 per cent) as compared to rural areas (6.9 per cent) and urban non-metro areas (4.3 per cent).

The Survey also pointed out poverty as a reason for increasing mental health issues among people. It showed that “stressful living conditions, financial instability, and a lack of opportunities for upward mobility contribute to heightened psychological distress”.

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It also highlighted an increasing prevalence of poor mental health among adolescents exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic. Citing the NCERT’s Mental Health and Well-being of School Students Survey, it showed that 11 per cent of students reported feeling anxious, 14 per cent as feeling extreme emotion, and 43 per cent experiencing mood swings.

The Survey noted key initiatives and policies such as the National Mental Health Programme and National Tele Mental Health Programme by the government to tackle the rising burden of cases. It also informed of increasing mental health professionals by sanctioning 25 Centres of Excellence to increase the intake of PG students.

The government also provisioned mental health services for 22 AIIMS, also provided online training courses via digital academies to general healthcare medical and paramedical professionals. The Survey stresses important policy recommendations including redoubling efforts to increase the number of psychiatrists, and sensitising mental health at the preschool, and at the Anganwadi level to provide precious early identification of disorders.

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–IANS

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